Local Experimental Music Showcase IV at Studio Soto
Friday, October 12, 2007

Non-Event presents
an evening of local experimental music
featuring

TIM FEENEY & VIC RAWLINGS
THE HUMAN HAIRS
MAX LORD

Studio Soto
63 Melcher Street
Fort Point Channel, Boston
$5-10 (suggested donation)/ 8:00 pm

About the artists:

TIM FEENEY seeks to explore and examine the timbral possibilities inherent in everyday found and built objects. He treats his percussion setup as a friction instrument, using bows, scrapers, and rosined drumheads to capture and amplify frequencies that go unheard when an object is struck with a traditional mallet. He supplements this acoustic console with an electronic instrument, arranged from no-input mixers, contact microphones, and effects pedals, that synthesizes and alters the spectral characteristics of low-fidelity sine tones, feedback, and noise.

VIC RAWLINGS (prepared/ amplified cello, circuitry) is an improviser and instrument builder. His performances focus on the metamusical potential of unstable sounds and silences. He has developed instruments that are specific to this compositional aesthetic. As an instrument builder he specializes in modifications of existing instruments and has developed extensive cello preparations.

The HUMAN HAIRS is a boy-girl duo dedicated to extended vocal techniques and arch art jokes, aided and abetted by noisemakers, karate outfits, rare old sound poetry records, last week’s newspapers, and bad synthesizers. The band began in 2007, but is already making a splash around their native Somerville, Massachusetts by playing in galleries and bars to the ear-plugging befuddlement of locals. Screeching, squealing, purring, yelling, blubbering, snorting, talking like Donald Duck, gargling, whispering, and spitting cough drops across the room are only a few of this band’s finely honed skills. Saul Jacobowitz and Angela Sawyer make a great big mess that’s fun for all.

MAX LORD is a percussionist who works with treated instruments and electronic sound. He is one of few musicians to adopt the Buchla Marimba Lumina, an expressive electronic mallet instrument. His drumset is often augmented by boxes of wires, large sheets of metal, and most recently amplified wire brushes. As an improvisor, he is known for restless changes of mood and texture, a sense for the absurd and frequent high-volume excursions. Last year he decided he should have a CD and released Electronic Music 2000-2005, a compilation of moody studio experiments with Marimba Lumina and the kitchen sink of electric tricks. He performs somewhat regularly in the northeast, both solo and in group improv situations.

This concert is supported in part by a grant from the LEF Foundation.